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Adventures with IPv6

I spent the past couple of days, tinkering with an old Linux box, trying to set up a fully functional IPv6 network, complete with an IPv6 webserver, nameserver, mailserver, network router and firewall.
The job is partly done.
The nameserver, webserver, network router and firewall are working quite well.
The website can be accessed here http://oak.ipv6.iiserk.net(Provided you have IPv6 connectivity). It runs on a rickety PIII running Ubuntu 8.04.1 and connected to my friend's home ADSL connection. Power failure are quite a common affair in our region (in almost the whole country, to be honest!) and there is no power backup for the server, so if it appears to be down, kindly check back sometime later.
The nameserver ns1.ipv6.iiserk.net manages the DNS records for the subdomain ipv6.iiserk.net.
I hope to get the mailserver up and running quite soon.
I'll also come up with a detailed documentation on how I got the things running, sometime in the near future.
Anyway for this half-crappy IPv6 implementation, I got this from Hurrican Electric Internet Services:

(It is a certificate, but removed the JScript, as it was causing the page to load slowly)
It started with "newbie" level, and is improving!
More on IPv6 soon... may be in a day or two.

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